The 2005 Mexican Conteo (Count)
The 2005 Mexican Conteo (Count) has been published. Compared with the 2000 Mexican Censo, the new count indicates a decline in the numbers of Mexican citizens who speak indigenous languages: from
6,044,547 in 2000 to 6,011,202 in 2005. This represented a drop from 7.2% to 6.7%. for indigenous speakers  5 years and older.

Most spoken languages, number of speakers, and percentage of all indigenous speakers:

1. Náhuatl:  1,376,026;  22.89%
2.  Maya: 759,000 speakers; 12.63%
3.  Mixtec Languages:  423,216; 7.04%
4.  Zapotec Languages: 410,901; 6.84%
5.  Tzeltal: 371,730;  6.18%
6.  Tzotzil:  329,937; 5.49%
7.  Otomí: 239,850; 3.99%
The states with the largest number of indigenous speakers and percentages of that state's population: 
1.  Oaxaca: 1,091,502 speakers; 35.3%
2.  Yucatán: 538,355 speakers,  33.5%
3.  Chiapas: 957,255 speakers;  26.1%
4.  Quintana Roo: 170,982 speakers' 19.3%
5.  Hidalgo: 320,029 speakers;  15.5%
6.  Guerrero:  383,427 speakers; 14.2%
7.  Campeche: 89,084 speakers; 13.3%
8.  Puebla: 548,723 speakers;  11.7%
9.  San Luis Potosí: 234,815 speakers; 11.1%
10.  Veracruz: 605,135 – 9.5%
Several  important Mayan tongues in Chiapas  increased between the 2000 Censo and the 2005 Conteo..   The five most widely spoken languages of Chiapas are:
1.  Tzeltal: 362,658 indigenous speakers ; 37.9% of the state’s indigenous population)
2.  Tzotzil: 320,921 indigenous speakers; 33.5%
3.  Chol:  161,794 speakers;16.9%
4.  Zoque: 43,936 speakers ; 4.6%
5.  Tojolabal: 42,798; 4.5%

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